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Thigh Gap Jewelry? Say...

Thigh Gap Jewelry? Say It Isn't So

We really hope these thigh gap pendants aren't the next big trend in body jewelry.

Thigh-gap jewelry? Really? This thigh gap thing has officially gone one step too far!


TGAPJ.com

Of course, that's exactly what "thigh-gap jewelry" designer Soo Kyung Bae wants you to think. Bae's thigh-gap pendants were created to make a statement about the unrealistic body standards set for women. You can't actually buy them. In fact, if you even try to purchase one of the nearly $200 thigh necklaces, the website stops you to deliver the real message.

"TGap Jewellery is a fictional company that sells jewelleries designed for thigh gaps," it reads. "It is launched to catalyze a debate on unrealistic body image social media portrays."

Bae, a final-year industrial design student at the National University of Singapore, launched the website this year on March 22 to start a conversation about some of the absurd things that we get distracted by, like having the perfect body. In the heat of so many Instagram thin challenges—like when people were trying to hide their midriffs behind an A4 sheet of paper—this seems like the just the time to get the conversation started.

"By using outrageous products, I hope to bring a provocative jolt that leads us to ponder and reflect upon what we are like as a society and the absurd things we value and obsess over—as well as how this creates unnecessary pressure for women and girls," Bae told Dezeen magazine.

She certainly caught our attention! But we weren't the only ones. Bae's work garnered all kinds of feedback from patrons, ranging from confused to enraged to appreciative, once they realized the site's true mission.

"The jewellery pieces take the thigh-gap trend to another level, the pieces are created in hopes of sparking questions," Bae said. "If we let the media keep popularizing such unrealistic body ideals, will this eventually become reality?'"

We certainly hope that crotch jewelry won't be a reality of the future. It sounds terribly uncomfortable.

Rachel Weeks

I'm originally from the Chicagoland area, but I recently moved from beautiful Des Moines, IA to the equally beautiful Denver, CO. I spend my days reading, binge-watching TV shows, performing and listening to comedy and, of course, writing.

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