We Hear You! Letters from our June 2011 Issue

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by MORE • editors
christy turlington june issue more cover image

Dear Ms. Coyne:

I enjoyed your baking article. Before I pass More on to a friend I felt compelled to write to you about coconut cakes. That was my birthday cake each year. But let me tell you how we made ours. Decades and decades ago I was raised in the south and we had cake, pie or cookies, along with biscuits, rolls or cornbread every day of our lives. Everything was completely made from scratch. To make a coconut cake... We went to the A&P grocery store and bought a coconut. Mother baked it in the over for awhile so that later we could easily remove the skin from the meat. After the coconut cooled, Mother drove a screwdriver into the "holes" with a hammer and poured out the milk. Then she handed the cocnut to my sister and me. We took it out on the driveway and chopped it open with an axe. After taking off the shell, we returned it to the kitchen, peeled the brown skin off, and grated the meat. The dough recipe is close to yours-- we call it a 1, 2,  3, 4 cake as the main ingredients were 1 c shortening, 2 c sugar, 3 c flour, and 4 eggs. Coconut milk, cow's milk, salt, baking powder and vanilla were added to the mix. But wait, I want to tell you about the hard part-- and what makes a coconut cake truly a coconut cake. Have you ever made 7 minute icing? Pllace 2 egg whites, unbeaten, 1 1/2 c granulated sugar, 5 T water and 1 1/2 t white Kato syrup in top of a double boiler over boiling water and beat for 7 minutes with an electric beater. Just as you think your wrists are going to break in half, the icing is perfect. Then you fan ice the cake and liberally sprinkle with shredded coconut, remembering to save some to press into the sides of the cake. Now, that's a coconut cake.

Sincererly, Suzanne Burns

 

 

I just filled out your extensive survey, but noticed when I clicked to return to the More website that you had a different cover for the June 2011 issue than the one I got in the mail.  The coral and green cover is MUCH better!  As a piece of art, the photograph of Christy Turlington on the gray background was beautiful.  As a magazine cover to start the summer, however, it completely missed the mark.  So glad to see you made such a quick course correction (the internet is a wonderful thing).  I look forward to reading more More!

Margret Evangelista

(Editor's note: We had two versions of the June cover. The coral/green photo was for newsstands only, while the black & white artistic shot was mailed to subscribers.)

 

As I sit in my not quite making it art gallery and pass the time reading, I found myself thankful for your Editor's letter today.  I left a successful Human Resources career to study interior design and try my hand at marketing local artists.  It has been a wonderful but also difficult journey.  I may be headed back to the HR bench next month.  I appreciate your willingness to encourage women to find a life that they love.  That has been my goal even when it hasn't always had a good financial outcome.

Karen Hart

 

First Published June 1, 2011

What’s your reaction?

Comments

Jane Dowrick06.28.2011

Love MORE - - enjoy the wide variety of articles. Was fascinated by the diet info in the July issue, although I'm concerned that the cleanse diet might not be safe enough for many people. Suggest an article on the wonderful food and diet info available online via Mayo Clinic. Thanks for all you do to provide such an array of information!

Fred Brenson06.25.2011

Hi, it's my first impression extensive survey I noticed here. mini laptop By the way I agree the coral and green cover is MUCH better! Affordable SEO link building packages :)

Rebecca Holzem06.12.2011

I received a subscription of your mazazine as a gift from my best friend.
I just finished reading the June 2011 Issue. Who is your demographic?? I am confused by the time I reach the end of each issue. In this particular issue, I began reading and felt confident that this magazine was addressed to me - a woman of 45 years. As I continued to read, your magazine ends with a focus on Hollywood's most impressive young stars that range in age from 13 to 28 - if I wanted to read about these "girls", I would pick up a copy of Teen Beat, People, or US. Where is your focus? Is this magazine not for women who range from 35, 40 years and older?
Your cover tag line is - MORE "For Women of Style and Substance". Where is the focus on Women, Style and especially Substance? The fluff piece on women who are still participating in pageants at age 30, 40 and even 50 was something not worth researching let alone including it in any magazine Women of Style and Substance are reading.
Also... Listed on your cover is best SWIMSUITS FOR EVERY SIZE, SHAPE AND BUDGET. However, there is not one single suit shown within the actual article for a woman who is over size 18. Are "plus" size women not inclusive in the demographic you would like to reach with your magazine? Or, are you of the mind-set that women who wear size 18W, 20W, 22W, etc. not interested in Style and fashion?
As a professional woman, I am not a fan of your magazine.

Chellie 06.10.2011

Once again we have another article about a celebrity-activist to inspire us. While I admire Ms. Turlington-Burns using her fame, wealth and privilege to inform the world of maternal health issues, I can't say the same for the author of this story. Why oh why does EVERY celebrity story have to include what the person was wearing during the interview and the ubiquitous "not wearing any make-up" line? Do we need to know, believe or even care about this? Is this statement to establish Ms. Turlington-Burns bonafides as a serious activist? If she were wearing make-up would her cause be less just? Please, please stop reducing women to their appearances in these articles. This is an article about an issue, not make-up and such comments simply detract from the subject of the story. I didn't read anything about Janet"s make-up or lack thereof, the woman who gave birth after walking almost five miles to a birth center If you are about empowering women, empower your writers to leave out physical descriptions that are not crucial to the story.

06.09.2011

I also filled out the survey and had written that I didn't like the picture on the June cover I had received (thought it was bland and boring), and then when I came to the website, I see the beautiful Christy Turlington Burns again but this time, I thought WOW! I so wished I had received THIS magazine. She looks so much more approachable, summery, and genuine, absolutely stunning, and I love the color! I would have been a lot more excited to read the issue had this picture been the introduction.

06.09.2011

I also filled out the survey and had written that I didn't like the picture on the June cover I had received (thought it was bland and boring), and then when I came to the website, I see the beautiful Christy Turlington Burns again but this time, I thought WOW! I so wished I had received THIS magazine. She looks so much more approachable, summery, and genuine, absolutely stunning, and I love the color! I would have been a lot more excited to read the issue had this picture been the introduction.

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