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The “ie” Effect

The “ie” Effect

My husband and I have a fairly significant problem brewing. With the arrival of our bundle of joy, a strange, vaguely disturbing phenomenon is taking place. If not resolved soon, I’m afraid it could become a full-fledged outbreak. I’m calling it the “ie” effect. Quite simply, our language is changing. Most baby-related words in our daily vocabulary have morphed into a language known only by other parents and inarticulate toddlers. A few examples:

diaper—“diapie”
pacifier—“pacie”
blanket—“blankie”
poo poo—“poopie”

The list, unfortunately, goes on. The worst part might be that as I hear myself saying, “let’s find your blankie so you can have a nappie-poo,” I simply can’t stop myself. “Nappie-poo” is, of course, “nap” with a little “poo” thrown in for extra measure. Truth be told, it rolls off the tongue with ease. At least my husband and I are in the same boat. When it’s just the three of us at home, the “ie’s” are flying left and right. If friends are visiting, however, we try desperately to keep it in check, as to avoid any curious looks in our direction. Sure, other new parents will understand and be able to decipher our new language. They might even nod in sympathy, as they too remember how they once spoke the King’s English.

While the Little One is certainly entertained, I gather she would be just as amused if we were speaking properly. So, I offer the following proclamation: we will fight against ending words with “ie.” We may not be successful right off the bat, but we will give it our best shot. We owe it to ourselves and our former ability to construct well thought out sentences. To the ears of unsuspecting strangers passed in the grocery aisle. To our baby and her future language skills.

But first, there’s a poopie diapie I need to change. 

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