You Can Take the Girl Outta New Yawk

But that doesn't mean she'll "blend." Consider these tips and a recipe inspired by a Wyoming trip. 

by Karin Duncker • More.com Member { View Profile }

I happen to live in a city that people like to visit. A lot. And as many of my fellow New Yorkers will (or perhaps should) admit, we can be a pretty intimidating bunch. It’s not that we aren’t friendly, warm or kind. It’s just that when you live with one and a half million humans (and countless other creatures) on a two and a half mile wide, 13 and a half mile long island, you tend to move around with shields up. Conversing with strangers without a specific and pressing reason to, well, let’s just say this kind of activity might raise an eyebrow and inspire swift movement in an away direction. And yes, we can be are loud, and brash, and a tad opinionated. Believe me, you would be too if you had to compete with as many huddle masses yearning to breathe free as you order morning coffee and bagel with schmeer at the local deli. So imagine the Gothamite’s dilemma when venturing forth from the center of the universe. (I know, it’s neither nice nor accurate to feel that way, but we can’t help it so allow me to apologize in advance for my kind.) When we behave as we’ve been conditioned, we come off as the "typical New Yawkah," and let’s face it, no one really wants to be that. So what’s a Metropolitan Miss to do? Make a valiant attempt to try to blend. O.K., as soon as those words left my fingertips, the vision of Marisa Tomei in My Cousin Vinny popped into your head, right? Yeah, you’re thinking, like you’d blend! I’m not suggesting putting on fake accents or mannerisms that just scream “I’m not from these parts.” Mocking the natives doesn’t exactly inspire the milk of human kindness in the locals. So skip the “y’alls,” “yah, you betchas” and “whoa, gnarly, dudes.” Just follow these few simple tips, and you’ll do just fine:

—Traveling south of the Mason-Dixon? Learn the proper use of the phrase "bless their heart." You can say damn near anything about anyone (and particularly the rather un-generous things) by post-scripting it with the phrase “bless her heart.” For example: “She’s a lovely girl, though bears a rather striking resemblance to Secretariat, bless her heart.

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