We Hear You! Letters From the February Issue

by the More.com Editors

Human and bovine milk (supplement or non-supplemented) normally contain small amounts of growth hormone. After ingestion, growth hormone is handled by the gut as any other protein in milk: it is digested into its constituent amino acids and di- and tripeptides. There are no data to suggest that rBST present in milk will survive digestion or produce unique peptide fragments that might have biological effects. Even if rBST is absorbed intact, the growth hormone receptors in the human do not recognize rBST and, therefore, rBST cannot produce effects in humans. (National Institutes of Health Technology Assessment Conference Statement, December 5-7, 1990)

Conventional, rbST-free and organic milk are compositionally similar; they have the same nutrient composition and the same trace levels of hormones regardless of the milk production method used. In fact, such milk label claims are not related to any meaningful differences in the milk's composition of fat, protein or vitamins and minerals. Because of the lack of a difference in the milk, no scientifically proven test exists that can identify how the milk was produced or whether or not rbST was used. (Vicini J et al. Survey of retail milk composition as affected by label claims regarding farm management practice. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Jul;108(7):1198-203.)

Drinking milk does not increase breast cancer risk, regardless of whether the milk is organic, rbST-free or conventional. There are many peer-reviewed studies that show no association between consumption of milk and incidence of breast cancer. A recent report that reviewed more than 40 case-control and 12 cohort studies concluded that evidence "does not support an association between dairy product consumption and the risk of breast cancer." (Parodi PW. Dairy product consumption and the risk of breast cancer. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Dec;24(6 Suppl):556S-68S.)

When it comes to food, it's personal. Yet, decisions about what foods to eat should also be based on the best information and the best science available. Let's work together to help women make wise choices about their health and nutrition, and give them a complete picture of the issues that relate to dairy foods and dairy consumption. We'll all be healthier for it.

Lloyd Metzger, PhD, Brookings, South Dakota

Silver Lining

Thank you for "This Is What 62 Looks Like" in the February issue.  I am precisely 62, and really enjoy seeing someone my own age.  You help me feel relevant!

Pat, Kansas

She Works Hard for the Money

First Published January 31, 2011

Share Your Thoughts!

Comments

Sheeba Varghese03.30.2011

I am a training for a 5-Day Coaching Intensive with the Life Purpose Institute. We just held a training in GA with 9 women from varying backgrounds, ages, fields of interests, etc. The stories of how women reinvented their lives in this issue just gave us such inspiration and motivation! As a coach, I inspire women to open their eyes to those endless possibilities out there. Often it is so hard to see one when we have been confined in a box of the "shoulds" for so long. Thank you for sharing these stories with us!!


I realize there are some glitches in the website; however, I'm still wondering about when you submit a story, and the "action" is listed as "edit," how is it that you find what it is that needs to be changed to meet your specifications?

Marianne Jacob03.07.2011

My comment has nothing to do with this article, but it is my attempt to notify someone with More about an article pending under my name. Thing is, it's not my story!! Somehow, someone else's story got linked with my name. It's titled "Musical Motif-Are You Repeating Yourself". I did not submit this. Thanks!!


What's with all the spam on the comments boards??? You should remove it and block the users. It's very distracting!

Chris Mac Neil02.27.2011

I was so glad to see that other people wrote in, in response to your article about dairy. I always thought of your magazine as one with a little more substance but this article has relegated you to the ranks of fluff magazines that I am not really interested in. The words: may be, could be, hypothesize, seems to, theory & the such are used over 20 times in this article. There is absolutely no substance whatsoever & seems to just be written to inflame the debate over dairy. Very disappointing to see an article like this in your magazine-why on earth did the writer write it if there is no substance to the claims? Please do not give merit to this kind of unscientific reporting (on a scientific article) by printing it.

Susannah 02.26.2011

I have been an avid reader of More for 8 years and always looked forward to all the wonderful features about 40 and over women!
Your Feb. cover girl Molly Sims is 37 years old and this months March cover girl Bridget Moynahan is not yet 40.
You have also featured Chloe Sevigny in your celebrity sit down...Chloe is 36!
I guess More's over 40 format is being phased out!
More has been key in keeping over 40 women visible, and I can't understand why this successful format is being changed!
Is anybody else not bothered by this?
Your March issue will be my last issue of More...Good luck with your new format.

stacy 02.25.2011

I totally agree with you blonderichmond...There is so much more to these radical "religions" than people realize, but that's definatelynot what they are promoting...oh, love the world, yadayada...yeah right! Muslims promote whatthey want you to hear.
Instead of More-For Women Style & Substance, the cover should say, "More-Our Political Agenda" It seems to be the common theme of the magazine...Muslim rights (on Ground-zero, that is!!) gay, lesbian, do what you want, no moral standards, buddism-you make your own destiny...marriage? forget-it! if you're not happy, just roll out! hmmmmmmm

Janet Howell02.13.2011

I loved the Work column this month,"Start Your Biz for Under $150. Really." Would you consider making this a monthly column, featuring a business each month? Even if the bar of $150 was a little low to keep it going, raising the limit a little higher and giving us new ideas to spring from each month would be sensational.


To Annemarie,
really? that is what you care about?, about how a First Lady is addressed. I especially liked your example of good old Carla. Wow!!, yea that was a good one. Anyway, chalk it up to the lack of good manners in today's world, especially the good ole New York Times, which you seem to hold dear. There is no respect

Diane Wilson02.10.2011

Loved your article, "Calming Your Internal Storms," by Katherine Ellison. It's so important to share about non-drug treatments for menopause, ADHD, and a host of other conditions. As a neurofeedback practitioner, we especially appreciate the exposure. What a great service!
Diane Wilson, LCPC
Board Certified in Neurofeedback
www.grimardwilson.com


To Daisy Khan, you live in a bubble, you refuse to realize that the majority of Muslims live in medieval times. It is a fact that they are very slow to modernize. Islamic women have little or no rights in the Middle East. They are beholden to a religion that has spun out of control, one that is so restrictive and backwards, that I cannot believe that any educated Muslim woman would not criticize it, but you will not. So, dear Daisy, that is what you should do, free your Muslim sisters, criticize your religion, (because there is much to condemn), when I hear that from prominent Muslim women, then I will believe you and "your so called ideals". Until then, I will suspend my belief in your so called benevolent religion.


It's been a lifetime ago since a fitness article, "A Reluctant Makeover" has moved & inspired me & spurned me into action! Judith Newman IS a bonafide wizard with words! She has captured the emotional (Real TEARS!), trials & tribulations of committimg to a fitness program in such an honest, humurous & informative article. Love her confidence and candor...She IS my new mentor! YAHOO!

Karen Kaufman02.02.2011

Kudos to Suzanna Andrews for an excellent article on Daisy Khan. While I do not doubt the sincerity of Daisy I think she needs to acknowledge that she was raised in a unique situation. The percentage of Islamic parents who have raised their families with the same views and values is minor in comparison to the rest of the Islamic world. Hopefully that percentage will improve, for the betterment of us all.


I'm curious as to why such a classy magazine such as MORE would address woman in their articles by their last names only? (February issue - Carla Bruni-Sarkozy). I quote, "In her role as first lady, Bruni-Sarkozy has elevated sheaths..." Is this anyway to address a first lady or any lady for that matter? How about a Ms. or Mrs. instead? Take note from the New York Times articles & use a little more class. I'm also curious if the employees address the Editor-in-Chief as Seymour & not Ms. Seymoour!

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