We Hear You! Letters from Our May 2013 Issue

Leave a comment here or send us your feedback by letter or e-mail—we love hearing your thoughts!

by MORE • Editors
lauren graham image

Wow.

 

I'm always so nervous when I receive my copy of More that it will be just another "pretty head" magazine, but you really outdid yourself on this issue.

The piece on female Catholic priests was WONderful and inspiring. And the shorter one on three women with mental illness was great.

Thank you for combining "pretty" stuff with the more substantial.  Love my subscription!
--Charlotte Versagi

Dear Lesley,

My co-worker let me see her May issue, being the first time I ever read your magazine, and I am more than just inspired. Although I am only 20 years old, there was so much I thoroughly enjoyed reading. I plan on buying quite a few products that were suggested and trying some new things that were mentioned. Thank you in advance!

What I really wanted to share with you was my mindset before and after reading Jenny Allen’s article “Once more onto the beach.” I just started planning my trip to the beach this past week. After my initial excitement about going, all my bathing suit insecurities set in. I soon went into frenzy about which workout plans I had to discipline myself to and which diet I had to stick with. Jenny’s title caught my attention because I did indeed need to know how to “suit up.” After I finished, I was just disgusted with my previous thoughts and already had a new mindset. I am going to the beach next month, I’m going to wear that bikini and I’m going to love every second of it.

Thank you again for all the inspiring words.

Sincerely,
--Laurel Hudson

Dear Lesley:

I thoroughly enjoyed Martha Ann Overland's essay, "The Boy Who Can't Wake Up," in the May issue of More magazine.

Like Overland, I am a middle-aged parent of a child with an undiagnosed disorder.  While Overland battles against her son's sleep disorder and chronic headaches, I battle against my son's autism and chronic gastrointestinal disorder which causes him to eat every two hours, both day and night.  I felt alienated and alone until reading Overland's essay. Now I realize there are other parents with teenage children who don't function like normal teens.  I'm not the only parent who sometimes wishes my struggles were more apparent and acceptable.  After all, it's easier to sympathize with a parent of a stoner than a parent of a child who looks normal although he can't wake up or stop eating.

Thank you for including stories from women who struggle with parenting abnormal children.  Our voices need to be heard.

Sincerely,
--Angela Lam Turpin

Hi Lesley

I know you welcome feedback and as I have recently unearthed one of the few Mores sold in this part of the world I thought I would tell you how delighted I am to have found you.

I'm a journalist/blogger specialising in news and features who lives on the West Coast of Scotland between Glasgow and Loch Lomond . I buy More in a small shop near Glasgow University and three copies on I am absolutely hooked. Reading is how I like to relax and adding More to the mix represents a real discovery.

I should say I am 42 and increasingly feel that a lot of publications really aren't catering to me. I Generation X and have only just swopped my Converse for Supergas -because Converse has of course been colonised by one and all! Does it sound precious to say I feel ageless? I do normally and especially when I read More but NOT when I read a lot of other publications.

I buy quite a few US magazines - I won't buy this month's Elle because the cover star is at least nearly three decades younger than me and why would Milie Cyrus interest me anyway? I can't give up Allure because I am too crazed about makeup and dream about going hog wild in Duane Reid all the bloody time! (I've been to NYC yes and Seattle when I lived in Vancouver for six months and I would love to come back to the States at some point)

Share Your Thoughts!

Comments

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Daphne Galvin06.02.2013

In "How To Find Happiness At Any Age", I found it interesting that there was no mention of "sex" or "sexuality". Hard to believe that those critical components of aging end in our 30's, especially when we are getting happier as we get older!

Cheryle 04.29.2013

The article “The Rebel Priests” in your May edition was a very disturbing and painfully biased article full of untruthful suppositions. It is quite apparent that the author did not take into consideration a number of very basic facts regarding the Catholic Church.
1) When a bishop is excommunicated, he loses all power to perform any sacraments. Ordination is a sacrament; no power to perform this sacrament means no valid sacrament. Hence these misguided women in your article were never legitimately ordained. If you are not ordained, you cannot be elevated to Bishop, thus these misguided women are not valid bishops and are not in succession of St. Peter.
2) To have a valid marriage within the Catholic Church, the ceremony must be performed by a validly ordained Priest or Deacon. I certainly hope that Ms. Venne is not misleading the couples that she “weds” that their marriage will be considered valid in the Catholic Church.
3) The 2010 Delicta Graviora did not “condemn” female priests, it simply reaffirmed in very clear language the church’s stance on the priesthood. The misguided women in your article are free to interpret this as condemnation; however it is a shame that they take such a stand.
4) The priesthood isn’t a myth dreamed up by authoritative or egotistical men; this is also based on scripture. God chose who would be his disciples (Mark 3:13-14). Read the passage closely – he chose all men.
5) The celibate priesthood is also based on scripture (Matt 19:12; 1 Cor 7:32). In John 13:34 God commands us to love one another as He loves us. This is not an easy commandment – to accomplish this requires a total commitment to the Church and her members. When a man is ordained to the priesthood he knows that his life from that point forward is about emulating Jesus, that he is to love us as God loves us. This is an amazing sacrifice; please do not diminish this unselfish act.
The author also makes the statement that the women profiled in the article had hoped that Pope Francis would allow women to be ordained priests. This is a Canon Law – not a guideline that is simply revised with each newly elected pope. The pope can change a Discipline but he cannot change Canon Law.
One last note: It is true that in the bible many prophets suffered for their cause; however it should be noted that the prophets were all following the laws and the word of God. It is very unfortunate that the women in this article are spinning the words of God into an elaborate web of deceit. Revelations 22:18 very clearly warns of such actions, I suggest they read this passage very closely.

Post new comment

Click to add a comment