We Hear You! Letters from Our May 2013 Issue

Leave a comment here or send us your feedback by letter or e-mail—we love hearing your thoughts!

by MORE • Editors
lauren graham image

I also buy O and I do think some of the articles are really thought provoking and the artwork excellent  but I do find it a bit vanilla pudding normalcy if you see what I mean. This is not entirely because I am single and childless but because it can seem a bit too cosy at times. It is also a bit girlie which I'm not big on.

My compatriot Anna Wintour is someone I really admire BUT I don't particularly enjoy US Vogue because I just cannot relate to it.

Randomly and from different issues: I particularly enjoyed your article about women who are handsome, the different types of marriages people had (I only doubted the couple who had a celibate relationship) and the fears of the woman whose husband was not paying his way. Your choice of cover stars is also a very big draw to me because they all sound like women who actually have something to say.

I think your magazine has a very European sensibility and is very sophisticated.  I just got back from Prague (I'm lucky enough to be able to travel quite a lot in Eastern Europe) and I can just imagine sitting reading More in a cafe there . Believe you me - I'd love to!

Anyway, I just thought you would like to hear!

And if your magazine ever needs a UK perspective on anything, all you have to do is ask!

All the very best to you and your staff
--Clare Grant

Thank you for the excellent article about Women Priests!  I am a fallen away catholic – so sickened by the sex –abuse scandal and the way it’s been handled.  I’ve just completely lost my spirit in the catholic church.
This article gave me new hope for our church!  You’ve given me some new resources I hadn’t run across before.  Thank you!

--Stephanie Perry

Hi Lesley, I loved your editorial in this months magazine. Thinking with a beginners mind is so freeing, there is no pressure to do it perfectly and making mistakes is expected. This really resonated with me and can make life a lot more fun. Thanks for the reminder!
--Heather Carey, MS
Culinary Nutritionist

Dear More (especially Ms Duin):

Wow! This article really left an impression on me and I am so joyful that there are women who are taking a stand for maintaining their faith and being who they are. Religion can be such a sticky and double-edged topic and this article really spoke to what is important while pointing out some of the injustices within religion for woman.

I grew up in a closed religious community (as many others have) and told I could be anything, just not this or that, and certainly not a priest. (We were told it was too "distracting" to men - don't get me started). So, now as a psychologist I am starting to understand the fear that is triggered when human rights "threaten" the status quo. I have never taken a stand as these priests have, with so much to lose. They are courageous. They must truely feel God's love and the action of the Holy Spirit. Change comes slowly and they will be remembered!

Thank you so much for publishing this article,
--Jessica Del Pozo, PhD

Hi Lesley. As a returning reader, I thought you'd like to know that I love your magazine and won't let my subscription lapse again. Also, for the first time in 40 years of magazine reading, I now read the Letter from the Editor, thanks to you. I read your February editorial, then loved the March questioning of why one fashion is suitable for a 40-year-old, but not a 50-year-old, and totally connected with your never-ending love of learning in the May issue. (I started studying archaeology in my 40's during a great career as a librarian.) I now read most of the letters from the editor in my 15 or so magazines, and I understand why you'd want to put your stamp on each month's issue, like naming a baby. Thanks for opening my eyes to the editors perspective on each issue.

Sincerely,
--Karen Conaway

Dear Ms. Seymour:

What’s your reaction?

Comments

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Daphne Galvin06.02.2013

In "How To Find Happiness At Any Age", I found it interesting that there was no mention of "sex" or "sexuality". Hard to believe that those critical components of aging end in our 30's, especially when we are getting happier as we get older!

Cheryle 04.29.2013

The article “The Rebel Priests” in your May edition was a very disturbing and painfully biased article full of untruthful suppositions. It is quite apparent that the author did not take into consideration a number of very basic facts regarding the Catholic Church.
1) When a bishop is excommunicated, he loses all power to perform any sacraments. Ordination is a sacrament; no power to perform this sacrament means no valid sacrament. Hence these misguided women in your article were never legitimately ordained. If you are not ordained, you cannot be elevated to Bishop, thus these misguided women are not valid bishops and are not in succession of St. Peter.
2) To have a valid marriage within the Catholic Church, the ceremony must be performed by a validly ordained Priest or Deacon. I certainly hope that Ms. Venne is not misleading the couples that she “weds” that their marriage will be considered valid in the Catholic Church.
3) The 2010 Delicta Graviora did not “condemn” female priests, it simply reaffirmed in very clear language the church’s stance on the priesthood. The misguided women in your article are free to interpret this as condemnation; however it is a shame that they take such a stand.
4) The priesthood isn’t a myth dreamed up by authoritative or egotistical men; this is also based on scripture. God chose who would be his disciples (Mark 3:13-14). Read the passage closely – he chose all men.
5) The celibate priesthood is also based on scripture (Matt 19:12; 1 Cor 7:32). In John 13:34 God commands us to love one another as He loves us. This is not an easy commandment – to accomplish this requires a total commitment to the Church and her members. When a man is ordained to the priesthood he knows that his life from that point forward is about emulating Jesus, that he is to love us as God loves us. This is an amazing sacrifice; please do not diminish this unselfish act.
The author also makes the statement that the women profiled in the article had hoped that Pope Francis would allow women to be ordained priests. This is a Canon Law – not a guideline that is simply revised with each newly elected pope. The pope can change a Discipline but he cannot change Canon Law.
One last note: It is true that in the bible many prophets suffered for their cause; however it should be noted that the prophets were all following the laws and the word of God. It is very unfortunate that the women in this article are spinning the words of God into an elaborate web of deceit. Revelations 22:18 very clearly warns of such actions, I suggest they read this passage very closely.

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