We Hear You! Letters from Our May 2013 Issue

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by MORE • Editors
lauren graham image

My roommate subscribes to  your magazine and I enjoy reading it; I especially want to commend you for the article "Fierce List" in the May 2013 issue, I noted Brig General Tammy Smith and Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth featured.  It looked like Congresswoman Duckworth was at the Women In Military Service For America Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery!  Both of these women are examples of "fierce" strong women who have served America and continue to serve.   Your magazine is uplifting and a positive influence for women, thank you.  Have you considered doing a feature article on the Women's Memorial, it is the only memorial to honor all women from all services who have served throughout American history.  It's a beautiful education center located at the gateway to Arlington National Cemetery?  Brig General Wilma Vaught, USAF, Retired is the President, she is another fierce woman who has worked tirelessly to raise the funds and build this memorial honoring our nations women veterans!    Thank you again for recognizing American servicewomen along with the other noteworthy women featured in your magazine. 

Sincerely,
--Pat Childers

Hello Lesley,

Your letter in the May issue made me question my self-diagnosed addiction to learning! I was truly humbled by your make-it-happen ambition.  I love your description of grasshopper moments, so I thought I would take you up on your offer to submit my own personal moment. 

I, like you, love to seek out new learning for my own personal growth.  I often feel myself being pulled toward new ideas and I have learned to follow and see what happens.  Currently,  my grasshopper moment is writing children’s stories.  I am a school teacher immersed in the world of children’s literature.  Although I have always been interested in writing, through the years I fueled my interest with my activities in the classroom.  This past year, I decided to take it a step further.   I decided to explore the world of publishing and see where it leads me.  After submitting to a few publishers, I definitely feel like a tiny green grasshopper!  Although I’ve been discouraged lately, reading your letter gave me a whole new outlook.  It awakened my usual positive self and revved me up for my next hopping adventure.  

Thank you,
--Franca DiFazio

Lesley,

Loved your "grasshopper" moments. I too have had many of them.After raising my family,  I went to college, at age 45,  and received my Masters degree at age 50. I had many great experiences as a social work/psychotherapist including doing therapy groups fin a women's prison, developing a diabetes program in a hospital and running a teen half way house before I opened my private practice. During the 27 years of practice I also co-wrote a book (Growing U with A Schizophrenic Mother) which had been a heart's desire for many years. I retired at 77 and said to myself, "Now what?" So, first I became more computer literate. Then, to learn  how to self-publish,  I wrote a small workbook (When He Won't Say Yes) Next, Next, I joined a feminist  book club with wonderful young women my granddaughter's age and  more  recently have started to sell books on the Internet. I keep looking for more "grasshopper moments" especially now that you have given me a name for them. Thanks for a great viewpoint.
--Doris Parker Roberts

Hi Lesley,

First let me say how much I enjoyed the latest issue of MORE.  I found inspiration both for myself, and for my cousin. to whom I sent several of the articles.  Thank you so much for having a magazine for us older sorts.

What’s your reaction?

Comments

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Daphne Galvin06.02.2013

In "How To Find Happiness At Any Age", I found it interesting that there was no mention of "sex" or "sexuality". Hard to believe that those critical components of aging end in our 30's, especially when we are getting happier as we get older!

Cheryle 04.29.2013

The article “The Rebel Priests” in your May edition was a very disturbing and painfully biased article full of untruthful suppositions. It is quite apparent that the author did not take into consideration a number of very basic facts regarding the Catholic Church.
1) When a bishop is excommunicated, he loses all power to perform any sacraments. Ordination is a sacrament; no power to perform this sacrament means no valid sacrament. Hence these misguided women in your article were never legitimately ordained. If you are not ordained, you cannot be elevated to Bishop, thus these misguided women are not valid bishops and are not in succession of St. Peter.
2) To have a valid marriage within the Catholic Church, the ceremony must be performed by a validly ordained Priest or Deacon. I certainly hope that Ms. Venne is not misleading the couples that she “weds” that their marriage will be considered valid in the Catholic Church.
3) The 2010 Delicta Graviora did not “condemn” female priests, it simply reaffirmed in very clear language the church’s stance on the priesthood. The misguided women in your article are free to interpret this as condemnation; however it is a shame that they take such a stand.
4) The priesthood isn’t a myth dreamed up by authoritative or egotistical men; this is also based on scripture. God chose who would be his disciples (Mark 3:13-14). Read the passage closely – he chose all men.
5) The celibate priesthood is also based on scripture (Matt 19:12; 1 Cor 7:32). In John 13:34 God commands us to love one another as He loves us. This is not an easy commandment – to accomplish this requires a total commitment to the Church and her members. When a man is ordained to the priesthood he knows that his life from that point forward is about emulating Jesus, that he is to love us as God loves us. This is an amazing sacrifice; please do not diminish this unselfish act.
The author also makes the statement that the women profiled in the article had hoped that Pope Francis would allow women to be ordained priests. This is a Canon Law – not a guideline that is simply revised with each newly elected pope. The pope can change a Discipline but he cannot change Canon Law.
One last note: It is true that in the bible many prophets suffered for their cause; however it should be noted that the prophets were all following the laws and the word of God. It is very unfortunate that the women in this article are spinning the words of God into an elaborate web of deceit. Revelations 22:18 very clearly warns of such actions, I suggest they read this passage very closely.

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