We Hear You! Letters from Our May 2013 Issue

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by MORE • Editors
lauren graham image

I had a bone marrow transplant two years ago, and have many compressed vertebrae from the cancer I have been recovering from, so I had to retire from my elementary teaching job and learn new things to do at home that are easy on my back.  I have always been able to knit scarves, but not much else, and decided to teach myself to knit sweaters.  I started out with one book of patterns and another book that visually showed how to knit different stitches.  Well I made a couple of sweaters on straight needles, then decided I had to take the plunge and learn how to use circular needles.  I have been knitting like crazy for the year and a half, always have a project, and have progressed from simple vests and cardigans, to short sleeved sweaters with lace patterns, and pullovers with a cable pattern on the top.  I've been learning to do some improvising on the patterns, and learning how to make them fit better.  Believe me, there are a lot of things that haven't worked out, and some of them I've given away (if they didn't fit me) or taken out and re-knit into different patterns.  Some sweaters just have mistakes, and that's the way it is.

But the most enjoyable thing about learning this, is that I had plenty of time and could learn by making mistakes, re-doing, and experimenting.  I think this way of learning is often lost in the hurry-up stressful world we live in and even if I wish I had never had cancer, I do appreciate the time it has given me to learn something from the bottom up, the hands- on way. 

Thank you for also appreciating how it is to be a new learner, and the wonderful perspective that gives us.
--Susan Alexander

Dear Lesley,

Let me explain how I came across your magazine. I am a 28 year old chef, and I live with a 65 year old retired artist. She is a great friend of mine, and an avid reader.

Now, I majored in English in college and minored in feminism. I enjoy the artsy stimulus of women's magazines, but as a whole they are terrible and vapid. I used to subscribe to some feminist magazines, I think Oprah's magazine is positive. But I am never really blown away by a magazine article.

This morning, my roommate and I were having coffee, and I noticed the "More" magazine on the table. The "style and substance" part caught my eye.

Hooray for substance! First, I read your article, "Living in the New." I loved it, and I completely get where you are coming from. I am returning to school for a second degree, and I think as a nation we should all just continue to study new things every year. It helps you feel young and progressive.

Then I read the article on Amy Baxter and her pain-relieving bee. Amazing. Really blown away by her power and persistence. What I really noticed about the article is how, as a person, she didn't just accept defeat when the factory burned down. And she didn't quit after the first 8 prototypes. Today's culture encourages the idea of instant success, and light should be shed on people who worked daily for years for one shred of promise. Today's culture encourages self-pity and wallowing. Just look at my entire 90's CD collection, all wallowing music. It is so easy to give up and cry about things. I am really proud of Amy for being relentless. That article was incredible.

Then, when I was super amped about my life after reading that, I read your "fierce" list. I had consistent goosebumps and was in awe of all of them. I am cutting the article out and keeping it. I wish Cosmo and Seventeen would publish equally substantial articles for young women so they know they are more than just their parts and their well-assembled outfit.

Thank you, Thank you, thank you. And thank all of the women on your "fierce" list for me. They are my models now. I needed some good models at this part of my life.

Sincerely,
--Heather Martinsen

Dear Lesley,

What’s your reaction?

Comments

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Daphne Galvin06.02.2013

In "How To Find Happiness At Any Age", I found it interesting that there was no mention of "sex" or "sexuality". Hard to believe that those critical components of aging end in our 30's, especially when we are getting happier as we get older!

Cheryle 04.29.2013

The article “The Rebel Priests” in your May edition was a very disturbing and painfully biased article full of untruthful suppositions. It is quite apparent that the author did not take into consideration a number of very basic facts regarding the Catholic Church.
1) When a bishop is excommunicated, he loses all power to perform any sacraments. Ordination is a sacrament; no power to perform this sacrament means no valid sacrament. Hence these misguided women in your article were never legitimately ordained. If you are not ordained, you cannot be elevated to Bishop, thus these misguided women are not valid bishops and are not in succession of St. Peter.
2) To have a valid marriage within the Catholic Church, the ceremony must be performed by a validly ordained Priest or Deacon. I certainly hope that Ms. Venne is not misleading the couples that she “weds” that their marriage will be considered valid in the Catholic Church.
3) The 2010 Delicta Graviora did not “condemn” female priests, it simply reaffirmed in very clear language the church’s stance on the priesthood. The misguided women in your article are free to interpret this as condemnation; however it is a shame that they take such a stand.
4) The priesthood isn’t a myth dreamed up by authoritative or egotistical men; this is also based on scripture. God chose who would be his disciples (Mark 3:13-14). Read the passage closely – he chose all men.
5) The celibate priesthood is also based on scripture (Matt 19:12; 1 Cor 7:32). In John 13:34 God commands us to love one another as He loves us. This is not an easy commandment – to accomplish this requires a total commitment to the Church and her members. When a man is ordained to the priesthood he knows that his life from that point forward is about emulating Jesus, that he is to love us as God loves us. This is an amazing sacrifice; please do not diminish this unselfish act.
The author also makes the statement that the women profiled in the article had hoped that Pope Francis would allow women to be ordained priests. This is a Canon Law – not a guideline that is simply revised with each newly elected pope. The pope can change a Discipline but he cannot change Canon Law.
One last note: It is true that in the bible many prophets suffered for their cause; however it should be noted that the prophets were all following the laws and the word of God. It is very unfortunate that the women in this article are spinning the words of God into an elaborate web of deceit. Revelations 22:18 very clearly warns of such actions, I suggest they read this passage very closely.

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