We Hear You! Letters from Our May 2013 Issue

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by MORE • Editors
lauren graham image

I've been a loyal subscriber of MORE since it's inception, but have decided not to renew or purchase your magazine from this point forward.  Every issue seems to have more "problem" articles:  how to deal with aging parents, children with problems, financial issues for the 40+ woman.  That's fine and needed, but it is very tiring to be looked at as a generation of problems that never seem to end.  Where is the fun?  Where is the inspiration?  Where is the fashion other than a quick 5 page spread?  My friends and I are NOT represented in the advertising, choice of fashion models or zest for life.  In other words, your magazine has become so serious it takes energy to even read the articles.  It seems you have lost the initial balance you had of enjoyment in life vs. addressing common problems we all have to face every day.  Please--we are not on our last breath and bit of energy from post menopausal issues; reading your magazine is like attending a funeral every time I pick up an issue.
--Dorothy Pedersen

Dear Meredith,

I recently made a life changing move to Southern California after raising children and caring for family in Tucson, Arizona for the past 25 years.

Shortly after moving into our California condo in November of 2012, I began receiving issues of More Magazine in the mail.  I found this odd because I dont think I purposefully subscribed.  I would become irritated each month as the issues came in the mail and felt as if someone was forcing this magazine upon me.  I felt guilty if I did not at least flip through it because of the trees involved and all the other ecological implications attached to its arrival in my mailbox.

Let me tell you, I am a pretty simple person and reading about what I can slather on myself or how I'm supposed to dress at my age doesn't hold my interest for long. I have serious stuff going on in my life. 

I'm 59 years old and I need a job.  I have lots of education but have not worked in my field for  many years.  Early in our marriage I chose to work only part-time and stay home with my 2 daughters.  I tried to work retail at one point  recently but was told by the 20 somethings that I worked with that I looked "good for such an old person".  I really love teaching meditation and educating anyone who will listen about alternative healing--but you can imagine that does not pay much.  So, all of this can create a sense of existential dread and anxiety in the middle of the night--even for someone like me who knows better.

Then came your May 2013 issue on a day when I was especially feeling the empty nest.  I was in need of empowerment and humor -- and I got them both.  The articles were exceptionally powerful this month.  "The Fierce List," "The Rebel Priests" and The art of fearlessness" especially stood out to me.

Delia Ephron reminded me that we are all sisters united in this "lifelong battle of empowerment versus insecurity, calm versus anxiety, positive versus negative".  Her suggestions made me laugh but also rang true for me.  Fix your hair, put on some jewelry, those biker boots really do feel powerful, and muster up your boldest female friend and say to yourself: "If she can do it so can I".

Find courage in humor.  Understand that feelings come and go.  Therapy in wonderful but in the end, life is much less complicated if you find your own healthy and creative ways to cope.

So, you have a convert to More. 

Sincerely,
--Lucy Peerenboom

Dear Editor,

The article "The Boy Who Can't Wake Up," in the May issue, made me realize how lucky I am to see my son grow up. It made me think of all the times this mother is missing out on: baseball games, recitals, learning to drive a car, having girlfriends, and just experiencing life with her son. I wish her and her family the best, and I hope they find a cure or remedy, which will allow her son to live a happy and productive life.

Sincerely,
--Bunny Arlotti

 

Dear Editors:

Share Your Thoughts!

Comments

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Hoyt06.21.2013

I am disappointed to watch More become another magazine for the 35-50 demographic. The occasional inclusion of a woman in her 60's is not enough to balance the focus on celebrities who are nearing or barely 40. There are many talented and interesting women in their 60's and 70's who have reinvented themselves several times and found fashion and a style that suits them. They have found a way to get "more" out of life, and I would like to read about them.
Unless I see some change back to the magazine I thought I was buying when I subscribed, I will allow my subscription to expire.

Daphne Galvin06.02.2013

In "How To Find Happiness At Any Age", I found it interesting that there was no mention of "sex" or "sexuality". Hard to believe that those critical components of aging end in our 30's, especially when we are getting happier as we get older!

Cheryle 04.29.2013

The article “The Rebel Priests” in your May edition was a very disturbing and painfully biased article full of untruthful suppositions. It is quite apparent that the author did not take into consideration a number of very basic facts regarding the Catholic Church.
1) When a bishop is excommunicated, he loses all power to perform any sacraments. Ordination is a sacrament; no power to perform this sacrament means no valid sacrament. Hence these misguided women in your article were never legitimately ordained. If you are not ordained, you cannot be elevated to Bishop, thus these misguided women are not valid bishops and are not in succession of St. Peter.
2) To have a valid marriage within the Catholic Church, the ceremony must be performed by a validly ordained Priest or Deacon. I certainly hope that Ms. Venne is not misleading the couples that she “weds” that their marriage will be considered valid in the Catholic Church.
3) The 2010 Delicta Graviora did not “condemn” female priests, it simply reaffirmed in very clear language the church’s stance on the priesthood. The misguided women in your article are free to interpret this as condemnation; however it is a shame that they take such a stand.
4) The priesthood isn’t a myth dreamed up by authoritative or egotistical men; this is also based on scripture. God chose who would be his disciples (Mark 3:13-14). Read the passage closely – he chose all men.
5) The celibate priesthood is also based on scripture (Matt 19:12; 1 Cor 7:32). In John 13:34 God commands us to love one another as He loves us. This is not an easy commandment – to accomplish this requires a total commitment to the Church and her members. When a man is ordained to the priesthood he knows that his life from that point forward is about emulating Jesus, that he is to love us as God loves us. This is an amazing sacrifice; please do not diminish this unselfish act.
The author also makes the statement that the women profiled in the article had hoped that Pope Francis would allow women to be ordained priests. This is a Canon Law – not a guideline that is simply revised with each newly elected pope. The pope can change a Discipline but he cannot change Canon Law.
One last note: It is true that in the bible many prophets suffered for their cause; however it should be noted that the prophets were all following the laws and the word of God. It is very unfortunate that the women in this article are spinning the words of God into an elaborate web of deceit. Revelations 22:18 very clearly warns of such actions, I suggest they read this passage very closely.

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