We Hear You! Letters from Our October 2013 Issue

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by MORE • Editors
queen latifah october 2013 cover image

One of your many misleading statements is that the tragedy of the deaths and injuries tied to the outlier NECC revealed “a giant loophole in the regulation of pharmaceutical products: the lack of federal oversight of compounding pharmacies…” Yet, the FDA actually had advance knowledge about problems at NECC as well as the power to take action against the company – but failed to do so. Compounding pharmacists are indeed under “obligation to let FDA inspectors through the door” if they are suspected of dispensing problem products. You actually note, contradicting your premise later in the article, that the FDA “has issued official Warning Letters to seven compounding pharmacies…”

The International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists, representing over 3,600 compounding pharmacists nationwide, supports law and regulatory changes at the federal level that will advance patient safety and ensure that we never have another NECC. But we firmly believe that state boards of pharmacy are appropriately placed and quite qualified to oversee the pharmacist profession, just as state boards have overseen physicians and hospitals for decades. You cite no evidence at all, nor a source, for the statement that “many state pharmacy boards do little to oversee the activity of compounders.”  In fact, we have never seen more changes to state pharmacy law than have been enacted over the last year.

One of the FDA’s many jobs is regulating the manufacturing of drugs, which is different than compounding. Compounders use FDA-approved drugs and other safe ingredients to meet the unique health needs of patients for whom off-the-shelf medications have failed. So it is a non sequitur to say that compounded drugs are not “subject to the FDA’s strict manufacturing standards.” Of course they are not – compounded drugs are not “manufactured drugs.” Not in ingredients, and not in quantity.

Compounding is a centuries-old practice, well-regulated, and relied upon by millions of patients and medical providers who seek a personalized solution to their health care needs. 

Sincerely,

--David G. Miller, R.Ph, EVP & CEO, International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists

How very RIDICULOUS is the Cover Picture of Queen Latifah...looks like maybe was taken when she was a teenager...let's get REAL!
--Anonymous

I have been a long time subscriber to More and have always vacillated between whether a read of the mag makes me feel better or worse about myself when it comes to aging. Not having the answer, I just renewed my subscription.

October was the start of the renewed subscription. Big letters on the cover, "Look better with age". I was doing pretty well, pretty happy with my cover-to-cover read - until I got to Ms. Maynard's piece. Huge fan of her writing, let me say. On a long waiting list at my library for "After Her".

But I can't tell you how demoralized I was after reading her piece.

I am 61 and have been told that I have beautiful skin. But my face fell, too, a few years ago. Only the very wealthy like Ms. Maynard, can afford her Restylane in our "eyes, cheeks, forehead and nasolabial folds" so that she can get her face "back", let alone getting it redone every 6 months or so. I don't believe I "earned" my face either, but I have to live with it unlike her.

Perhaps you could have had a companion article, or do one in November, explaining why on earth it costs so much. What are the cosmetic pharmaceutical companies making on these tiny tubes of youth serum? Does it have to be so expensive? Is it so dangerous that their liability insurance requires such high costs? And what does the future hold for the rest of us? Will the costs ever come down? Or will it always only be available to the very rich?

Please do some investigative reporting into this issue. It's cruel to the rest of us.

Meanwhile, I'll lie down tonight to sleep and take a mirror out of my bed stand table to see "sort of" what I used to look like while I'm lying flat and not drooping.

That's my reality, and many others, I'm sure.
--Anonymous

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Comments

Taylor10.30.2013

Thank you for such a fantastic and enlightening issue for October. From the Queen Latifah interview to the eye opening article regarding incest by Kathryn Harrison, it was an enjoyable page turner! I have a small confession to make though - one of my favorite things in every issue is the Notebook page. It always gives me fun quick facts or sometimes just a few laughs. Thanks agin for putting out a magazine that is both intelligent and entertaining.

Lulu Witcoff10.17.2013

Your article about the female conductor Marian Alsop was terrific except that I was stunned that you did not mention that she was the first female conductor at Sir Albert Hall of the BBC's Last Night of the Proms in the Park 2013 in London this past September. I was lucky enough to attend that performance and I was thrilled to see the first woman conductor AND an American! The Last Night of the Proms culminates 58 nights of music and is an amazing spectacle - she was also witty, entertaining - fabulous!!

10.16.2013

As a woman who has tried both bioidentical and FDA approved HRT I am shocked by the misleading and quite frankly, slanderous spin of this article. I could write a novel about the years I tried to help my body get through menopause with chemical "equivalents". I could write another novel about how a Naturopathic physician who prescribed compounded BHRT (in cream form, which is better absorbed than pill form) helped me feel like a vibrant woman again, not some nut job bouncing off walls, growing facial hair and a penis from the one-size-fits-all FDA approved horse urine therapy. But I will simply say this, your story is blatantly irresponsible and will only serve to get more women interested in drugs, which will help the FDA to achieve its goal of tapping into that $2.5 billion dollar biodentical "industry". The government needs to get its hands off of my body and moreover, my constitutional right to choose what I put into it. Thank you very much, I'll pick yams over pregnant horse urine every time.

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