We Hear You, Part I for the July/August Issue

Readers respond to the July/August issue

by the More.com editors

 Airbrush Heaven
Dear Lesley, This is the very first letter I have ever written to a magazine and although I don’t usually pay attention to ads/cover photos in magazines, I had to take issue this time. I saw Ms. Sedgewick on a TV talk show about a month ago and I have never thought she was beautiful but makeup does help. However, her cover shot on the July issue doesn’t even look like her. She is not that beautiful and her face is very square. Also, the Cover Girl ad next to your story portraying Ellen DeGeneres…she looks like she is 19 and I know for a fact she does not look that way even on her show.

I am a grandmother, 64 years young, take excellent care of me, my skin and body and I am happy (as are others) with the way I look without all the hocus pocus you all use to make someone look pleasing to us. I wear excellent makeup that brings out my beauty. Bring on the real girls! I have been enjoying your magazine but lately have been disappointed that you are not giving me MORE but LESS in the REAL department. I, for one, will not buy any of the products who use unreal models or so much airbrushing to sell to me…no way. Also, I will be rethinking my purchase of MORE…too fake for me and I thought you may have had it all right. Too bad.
Trish Brown
Denver, Colorado

Voodoo Science
Perhaps Nancy Kalish thinks she is doing us a favor enumerating the items we can eat to, in her words, "protect ourselves" from breast cancer. This is voodoo science, witchcraft—an irritatingly smug form of hocus-pocus—created to make us feel that we have some measure of control over what we all dread, cancer. I’m fifty-four. I’m not fat; I’m rarely sick. I’ve been following all the rules that Nancy Kalish outlines for years, not because I was afraid of getting cancer but because eating well makes me feel better. I walk every day. I live the life I want to live. I manage my stress with yoga and deep breathing. And two months ago I was diagnosed with metastatic invasive lobular carcinoma in my left breast.

I don’t believe that diet can protect you or me from cancer. The best we can hope for is to be as healthy as possible to endure months of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation if and when they find it.
Nancy Jarzombek
Belmont, Massachusetts

Looking Great Has a Price Tag?
I’m a relatively new subscriber to MORE and generally, I enjoy it. But I have to comment on "The Flower Child Grows Up" article on page 18. Is MORE seriously suggesting its readers purchase a $1,225 skirt or a $465 pair of sandals to “look great from head to toe?”
Pat Quinn

A Special Topic
I have been a subscriber to MORE magazine for many years, and although I enjoy reading most of the articles, there is a certain feeling of reading about similar topics over and over.

One subject close to my heart that I’ve haven’t seen featured is raising a child/young adult with special needs, as thousands of us are doing across the country. In my case, I’ve got a 15-year-old boy with cerebral palsy/global developmental delays along with an aging Dad. Sometimes the situation makes me laugh; sometimes I cry, but I know that I am by no means alone in this double-whammy. Please include our story in your magazine in coming issues.
Michelle K. Wolf
Los Angeles, Califronia

Dismissal of Tenure
Kudos to Claudia Dreifus for challenging the obscure practice of tenure in education. As I raise 2 teenagers, I respect the fact that educators are critical to their lives and future. A good teacher is invaluable. After learning this lesson the hard way, I now have my children in 2 different high schools but both with fresh, inspiring and engaged faculty. I moved my eldest from a public high school, IB program, to a private catholic school due to the apathetic attitudes of the tenured faculty and principal. The tenured teachers have lost their drive and energy to educate. The classes are large (40+/class) and the students more behaviorally challenging. I found the non-tenured teachers to be significantly more consiencious of their performance and need/ability to motivate the students.

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