Holidays With Kids In Charge

by Carine Nadel • More.com Member { View Profile }
Lets share something good to eat from my bad
Photograph: Carine Nadel

Years ago, in another life, I was a pre-school teacher and day care provider. My husband and I ran our own business. I was trying to come up with a different way for all of the kids to celebrate the holidays that would be fun and yet teach them about how their friends enjoyed the end of the year with their family.

I decided the best way was by using what I knew best-food. But not just the food but the story behind it.

 

So in my monthly newsletter to the parents I requested that each of the 12 families decide what food meant that their holiday had officially begun and the story behind it. I let them know that it would mean the most to their little ones and the other kids if they not only sent the goodies to class but told about their traditions to the kids themselves.

 

At first the parents told me that they didn’t mind sending a plate, but that they didn’t have the time to take off of work and would just give me their story verbally on their appointed day. But when the first parent came in our door with a plate of cinnamon rolls the kids were clamoring around her and wanting to know what it was. Other parents saw the commotion.

 

I suggested that since the cinnamon rolls were fresh and warm that instead of my planned breakfast that maybe we could have them with our hot cocoa and fruit and “would you stay and tell us why they’re special? It will only take a few minutes.”

 

 

The kids sat down and as this one lone mom served up the rolls she explained that her mom’s mom got the recipe from her grandmother and that they ate these knowing that when they were threw-they got to open their presents.

 

The other parents then began to realize that this tiny bit of time that they took off from work meant the world to not only their child, but to all the kids.

 

I always make homemade applesauce and latkes and explained their meaning to the kids. We had a family bring in the leftovers of their roasted goose, stained glass cookies, snicker doodles, noodle kugel and even black-eyed peas and dirty rice.

From that year on until we closed our doors 8 years later-this became one of the highlights of being in Carine’s Day Care Corner.

Years ago, in another life, I was a pre-school teacher and day care provider. My husband and I ran our own business. I was trying to come up with a different way for all of the kids to celebrate the holidays that would be fun and yet teach them about how their friends enjoyed the end of the year with their family.

I decided the best way was by using what I knew best-food. But not just the food but the story behind it.

 

So in my monthly newsletter to the parents I requested that each of the 12 families decide what food meant that their holiday had officially begun and the story behind it. I let them know that it would mean the most to their little ones and the other kids if they not only sent the goodies to class but told about their traditions to the kids themselves.

 

At first the parents told me that they didn’t mind sending a plate, but that they didn’t have the time to take off of work and would just give me their story verbally on their appointed day. But when the first parent came in our door with a plate of cinnamon rolls the kids were clamoring around her and wanting to know what it was. Other parents saw the commotion.

 

I suggested that since the cinnamon rolls were fresh and warm that instead of my planned breakfast that maybe we could have them with our hot cocoa and fruit and “would you stay and tell us why they’re special? It will only take a few minutes.”

 

 

The kids sat down and as this one lone mom served up the rolls she explained that her mom’s mom got the recipe from her grandmother and that they ate these knowing that when they were threw-they got to open their presents.

 

The other parents then began to realize that this tiny bit of time that they took off from work meant the world to not only their child, but to all the kids.

 

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