We Hear You! Letters from Our July/August 2011 Issue

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more.com Editors

Although there was an apologetic tone to the article that indicates some tension within More's staff regarding it, I have to say that I found the decision to cover "the $65 million mom" a very poor one.

The Kardashians represent virtually everything that is wrong with the US today.  They are not entrepreneurs, they are money and publicity whores.  Their lifestyle is devoid of values (other than seeking money and fame and hedonism), and the idea of working and thinking hard to do something requiring use of one's intellect is clearly out of their league.

Although I admit I glanced over rather than read the article, I had to laugh at the part where it says that Mrs. Kardashian didn't seek support from her ex, Mr. Kardashian, suggesting that she placed her family above the fray.  Anyone who’s been around for a while knows that the only reason a person who values money this much would avoid seeking alimony is called dirt -- apparently Mrs. Kardashian has dirty laundry that she didn't want Mr. Kardashian to expose, so she agreed to not get any alimony.  Yes, Mother Teresa sparing her family.  I think not.

I am a capitalist and know that this economy needs risk taking, hard work, and other "old fashioned" values to get back on track.  I am a Northeast liberal, not a Tea Party ideologist (though that is largely a contradiction in terms).  But there has to be some limit on what is considered worth writing about, and More exercised questionable judgment on this one.  The woman sold her family due to her own inability to earn funding for the life she feels is her entitlement, and they, being raised by her, of course went along with it.  The acorns don't fall far from the trees on this one.  As for the new hubby, she apparently needed to bail him out as well due to his lack of self-control with money, having earned a fortune but being worth less than nothing when they married.  I guess Mrs. Kardashian isn't merely a hard-working entrepreneur, she's also a philanthropist.  I think not.

I strongly suggest that better judgment be used in selecting people to profile.  If I wanted to read about trash, I'd buy the celebrity rag magazines.  It's stuff like this that has Americans looking for the quick fix to becoming rich and famous through a reality show, rather than focusing on having a comfortable life based on hard work and real accomplishment.

Sincerely,

Marguerite Schneider, Hoboken, NJ

Just read your Never Say Diet article... I am in my late 50's (ugh that sounds foreign) and have been struggling with that dreaded 5 lbs.  Heavy people sneer at a need to lose 5 lbs, but they are the hardest, as you seem to know.

I heard whispers about Carole Middleton (mother of Princess Kate) being on this radical diet called Dukan to lose weight for her daughter’s wedding.  Shortly thereafter, a friend of mine said she was doing the Dukan diet and was having great success.  I read the book and decided to give it a whirl.  She wanted to lose 25 lbs, and she followed it to the letter. Me, I did the first three days as instructed and then my martini drinking husband got the best of me. I gave in to the martini, but otherwise followed it to the letter.  I lost 8 lbs and have kept if off for several months now.  I was on a week-long trip, eating in restaurants and still didn't gain weight.  If I put on 1/2 lb. I have a pure protein day and it's gone (and I still get to enjoy a martini or a glass or two of wine). Just thought I'd share another means to the end of the dreaded muffin top.

Sincerely,

Robyn Rands

Once again, I am not disappointed in the "substance" part of your latest issue of "More". Deborah Kogan's writing is so moving and heartfelt; I could feel her pain, although I have never undertaken anything of the sort she has.  I praise her for speaking out and you for printing her story.  

Thank you for printing such thought-provoking substance.

Sara Stamey, Hillsboro, Oregon

I just finished reading "War Photographer's Turning Point" which I enjoyed.

It brought up a reoccurring thought that has had no placement for me that I feel needs to be heard by a wider audience in the world rather than swimming in the same loop in my head.

In the article the phrase "losing one's virginity" was voiced.

We are in 2011.

Girls, unless victims of violence do not LOSE their virginity, in fact in this case they have it brutally taken from them. Girls/women make a choice to have sex. It is not like losing your cell phone or keys. It is a choice made for a myriad of reasons, but never the less is a CHOICE.

When society keeps referring to this issue as a "loss" it disempowers women and makes them sound like victims and continues to falsely empower boys/men.

I am dying and feel like there is no time like the present to say what is on my mind.

I am one of those who were brutally introduced to sex in infancy....so I know for sure I had no choice and did not lose anything..... I had it taken.

Why not empower young women to make good choices by informing them it is THEIR CHOICE how they conduct themselves and how they choose to use their bodies.

Thank you for listening....I finally said what has been on my mind for years.

Sonya Bavvai

I'd never actually heard of Mary Crowley, yet alone the More magazine (please excuse me) until about 20 minutes ago. My mom brought me this magazine, and showed me the article "The Lady Talks Trash" and told me to read it.

I was instantly captivated and utterly excited to see this. Mary is now officially my woman hero!

For my last sophomore English class project, we were given a research project to find an issue and write a paper about it, give a speech, blah blah blah all that. I was not excited...but I then found a subject I actually found interest in: The plastic collection in the ocean.

When I read this article, I was simply ecstatic: D Almost all the fine detail and facts within the article were in the speech I’d given, and I thought I’d been about the only one to know about them, but nope. 

And of course people do know about the plastic collection, but hardly anyone I gave the speech to had known about it. Ridiculous! So to see this wonderful article, I knew that it would spread the word of such a horrible growth in our beautiful oceans, and I do hope it makes a change.

The reaction of my classmates was horrified, yet seeming to want to take action and start to recycle and such, so I can't imagine the impact that this will have to whomever is to read this incredible article.  

It really got to my heart and I just want to say I felt a great connection. We need some real change in this world. I SALUTE YOU MARY!! Please let me know if there is anything I can do for your incredible Project Kaisei because it means the world to me. 

Even if it means kissing a pig. Or perhaps something more prominent like really getting to work in the war zone. I would love to help! Or not I can be there for moral support too :)

And thank you whoever wrote the article itself. It was very well written.

Anna J Stone (15 years old), Kalispell, Montana

 

When I purchased a copy of the July/August 2011 issue of MORE for Women of Style & Substance, I expected just that. However, the article entitled “More sex, please!” by Thea Singer stated that soft-core porn, specifically without “pumped-up breasts” and “no hint of violence” should be included in a shopping trip for “appropriate  ‘adult entertainment’.” As a woman of style and substance, the suggestion that women should support and endorse an industry that objectifies people in general, and young women specifically, as sexual objects is offensive and distasteful. By specifically stating what to avoid, I presume the author is aware of the dangers of unrealistic body images and sexual violence. There are plenty of magazines that espouse Ms. Singer’s perspective; sadly, yours had to join their ranks. Thank you for your time and consideration.

 Sincerely,

Terri Mossgrove, Tampa Bay, Florida

 

With today's uncertainty and our economy, I believe we should take personal responsibility for our health in order to prevent many illnesses and diseases. So much can be changed about our health and well-being if we just changed our eating habits and increased intake of water. I contacted Lyn-Genet after reading her story in More July/August. That day I was curled up in a ball with a blanket feeling so bad and thinking I had a terminal disease and my new husband was going to watch me die. Her method of healthy eating gave me new hope and I was eager to try her suggestions and read everything she has ever put in writing. I was suffering from hip pain, leg pain and arthritis in my right foot. I had to hold onto the banister to climb the stairs and I felt pain in those areas most of the time. After my first contact with her, she was so kind to send me a list of reactive foods to avoid and selections to eat for the first three days. In just 24 hours I was pain free. I have learned, while I thought I was eating a perfectly healthy diet, many of us cannot eat certain foods just because the mass media says we should. Salmon two times a week is not for everyone. The other white meat (pork) is poison to me. My experimenting goes on daily and I am truly listening to my body. I can move faster, climb stairs, feel wonderful and have not had a meal from her suggestions that I didn't enjoy. I don't feel hungry, although, the foods are light and very low in fat. I know I am not as energetic if I have not had the two liters of water each day. My new way of eating will stay with me for many years and I am looking forward to physical activities I have not participated in for a very long time.

Carol Davis O'Connor, Fayetteville, Arkansas

I have been reading your magazine for around a year now. And I quite like it. I have however found something that I am annoyed by. It concerns the clothing styles. I find that I much like the styles and therefore when listed I go to the website to take a closer look and possibly order. But when I get to the website the items are not there. This has happened several times. So I thought with this new issue I would write you with my examples. For instance of the July/Aug issue on page 30 item 4 the shorts. I went to the website goldyandmac.com. The shorts are not in their line. Then on page 104, item 9 is for nautica.com. I also went there and could not fine that top. I did look at other places for that top too that I know sells Nautica, but no luck. I have a feeling it was never for sale in their line. This is so disappointing to me.

I am hoping for future magazines that if it is printed where the items can be found, the source is researched more.

 

Thank you for your time in reading this.

 

Regards,

Rhona Krumm, Boone, IA 50036

With today's uncertainty and our economy, I believe we should take personal responsibility for our health in order to prevent many illnesses and diseases. So much can be changed about our health and well-being if we just changed our eating habits and increased intake of water. I contacted Lyn-Genet after reading her story in More July/August. That day I was curled up in a ball with a blanket feeling so bad and thinking I had a terminal disease and my new husband was going to watch me die. Her method of healthy eating gave me new hope and I was eager to try her suggestions and read everything she has ever put in writing. I was suffering from hip pain, leg pain and arthritis in my right foot. I had to hold onto the banister to climb the stairs and I felt pain in those areas most of the time. After my first contact with her, she was so kind to send me a list of reactive foods to avoid and selections to eat for the first three days. In just 24 hours I was pain free. I have learned, while I thought I was eating a perfectly healthy diet, many of us cannot eat certain foods just because the mass media says we should. Salmon two times a week is not for everyone. The other white meat (pork) is poison to me. My experimenting goes on daily and I am truly listening to my body. I can move faster, climb stairs, feel wonderful and have not had a meal from her suggestions that I didn't enjoy. I don't feel hungry, although, the foods are light and very low in fat. I know I am not as energetic if I have not had the two liters of water each day. My new way of eating will stay with me for many years and I am looking forward to physical activities I have not participated in for a very long time.

Carol Davis O'Connor Fayetteville, Arkansas

 As a retired captain for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who spent many years studying oceanography, a colleague sent me your article on ocean pollution, “This Lady Talks Trash.”  As part of my work, I visited the so-called “Garbage Patch” and I was glad to see your writer and Ms. Crowley correct the common exaggeration regarding the size of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.  Oregon State University released a study earlier this year that found that if the all the oceanic debris and garbage were consolidated into the size of a football field, all plastics would be accounted for by the one inch line – that’s not to downplay the fact that we need to do something about ocean pollution, but it must be done in a smart way, looking at the facts, and working together.  In an era of deep rhetoric regarding environmental politics, I appreciate Ms. Crowley’s work as she tries to seek out a meaningful solution. Thank you for reporting it.

Timothy Wright, Captain, NOAA (ret.), Chesterfield, MO

 I really appreciated the "Under $100" issue featured in July/August.  Although I can afford most products shown in your publication, I felt that this issue was more reasonable for most middle class professional women. Thank you More! I enjoy your magazine and share it with my sister and friends.

Julie Thompson, Houston, Texas

There's something incongruous and a bit disturbing in the article 'One Smart Kookie' written by Leah Rozen. The casually informative style of writing, including the clever title, took on a strange note when I read about Lisa Kudrow "traveling to Belarus to visit the site where her paternal great-grandmother was killed by Nazis in a mass shooting of villagers at the edge of a pit; afterwards the bodies, which had fallen into the pit, were set afire."  Following this horrifying description, the writer immediately goes on to  say that  Lisa flew to Poland and reunited with a distant cousin and relative, who exclaimed "Lisa Kudrow, not on my TV but in my home." This made me search back  for the passage earlier in the article when Ms. Rozen explains when describing Lisa and her husband that Lisa is "herself, a non practicing member of the tribe. "(Jewish)  It is one thing to describe events in a casual way, as to not be morbid, and another to gloss over a horrendous historical event that touched Lisa so closely, treating it as just another in a series of tidbits about the star. I wonder what Lisa's grandmother would think of that remark about a non- practicing member of the tribe, when she died just because she was Jewish! There is great sadness in the juxtaposition of those two items in the same story. Especially as Lisa's show is all about discovering who you really are.

Lousie Herman, Lake Worth, FL

Dear Lesley, As a successful, 40-something actress in Hollywood, MORE has been my go to for informative and fun reading about woman of my age and mindset. I used to crawl up in bed with it the day it came in the mail!  I couldn't wait to read it. I have subscribed for over 6 years and  I used to tell my husband itMORE was the only magazine I ever read front to back .  In my entire 30-something years as an avid magazine reader (starting w/SEVENTEEN when I was 13 years old) I have never, until now, written a "letter to the editor." But after seeing the back page of the current June issue, my heart sunk once again, as it has again and again over the past few months when reading MORE. Please please please! do not waste your pages or my time with photos and blurbs of "young stars" and starlets. I get enough of that everywhere I go. The dentist, the grocery store, work,  the car wash...... There is no place in my life that is not inundated with those images. Lately, you have regressed and pulled away from why I sought out MORE in the first places. The women are getting younger and the fashion less wearable. We really don't need another picture of Lea Michelle---Love her, adorable, watch Glee....BUT! that's not why I turn to MORE. For goodness sakes, Spare us! My subscription is up in August. It is the first time I have ever thought:  "the hell with it" -why get it anymore? Your magazine used to make me feel alive, vital and worth while...beautiful. MORE gave me hope I didn't have to go down that negative old "to hell with it " path. ( The first sign of old age, right?  :) But the magazine is feeling stale. Just like the same old -same old ones I left behind.Have the courage to grow with us, Lesley. If you the courage to do that, I will have the courage to renew. Please don't leave us behind in the starlet dust.
Your once faithful reader,
Catherine Dent

I love your magazine, but I feel compelled to write about one article that really disturbed me.  "America's Next Top Diet Guru?" read as an advertorial and not a real article.  The "science" in it was clearly junk and there was no balance of expert opinion.  Celebrity chefs are not enough to give credit to an article with questionable nutrition advice.  It seems like More's editor in chief just LOVED this person and decided to use her position to promote Ms. Recitas's business.  Also, the interviewer was more like a cheerleader than a objective reporter.  It left a bad taste in my mouth.  I've learned over the years that if a person has to actually say, "I'm not making up all this stuff," he or she usually is.  Oh well.  The damage is done and Ms. Recitas is laughing all the way to the bank.  And my opinion of More has been tarnished.  Remember the magazine is for women of style and substance.  Respect that. 

Amy Austell, Durham, NC

Dear More, July/August 2011 was an excellent issue. I am proud of ShutterBabe [Deborah Copaken Kogan] for speaking out, it shows its never too late for any of us. The final words "That is the problem with the abuse of power of any kind, whether physical or verbal.  It tuns a strong woman weak." should resonate with all of us as women.  I recently contacted my high school basketball coach from thirty years ago. She denied me my freedom of speech, a deserved award and treated me like I was dirt when I was a young adult.  My coach's response thirty years later at the age of 55 still faults me for the pain she caused.  I wasn't going to report what she had done to me as a seventeen year old, but after reading this article, I'm going to do it because she is still a coach and I don't want her harming anymore young women like me.  It still to this day, surprises me how women can treat other women. I am strong in spite of my former coach not because of her.  I will not sit in silence anymore. On a side note, I feel it ironic that you would have an article about saving sandwiched between ads to get us to spend our money. Couldn't this space have been bought by such companies such as Fidelity or some other investment companies?

BJ Winchester

I about fell off my chair laughing when I read the quote from comedian Sarah Silverman on the More/now! page of my new July/August issue of More Magazine. "If you don't have enough regret in your life, try cutting bangs." ... It reminded of an old family photo of my 6-year-old self sporting the world's most crooked bangs cut for me by my well-meaning and thrifty mother. She had absolutely no regrets about the episode - but I sure did! They took forever to grow out.

I'm disgusted that so many people, especially feminists, blame women for the sexual assaults they endure and survive. Kogan is heroic for speaking up.  She is a woman of integrity, a woman I would like to know personally. In a world where women hate women, what relief and comfort can we find, especially when the enemy is men? Thank you for giving us Kogan's voice.

Angela Lam Turpin

MORE appears to be MORE obession about aging and gaining weight.  Don't intelligent and stylish women have better things to constantly focus on?

Lisa Van Raalte

Mount Pleasant, SC

Hello, I wanted to tell you that I absolutely love your column. I have never read the "editor's letter" in magazines, but now that I have read yours, I read all of them.  I wanted to mention your letter on reinvention.  I am so grateful for the stories of reinvention at any age. I am not sure what women are writing to say they do not like these stories, however, at 42, I have met so many women my age starting new marriages and careers.  Please keep these stories coming!

Darlene

I have to say, I have never seen a worse cover photograph on a magazine in my life. The hair across her forehead that is totally distracting, the static hairs on the top of her head...if I were Lisa K I would find this unforgivable. I turned to the credit page first hoping for some kind of explanation, then the article, looking for something to justify the illogical, messy choice...and when I didn't find an explanation I set the issue aside. Have you lost your minds? Your vision? I know this- you're loosing this reader's respect.This picture doesn't look like an action shot, it doesn't look like a windblown shot, it's just a distracting mess. What what what could you possibly have been thinking?

I have been reading your magazine on and off for years now and just recently subscribed.  I love that you showcase beautiful woman over forty still pursuing their dreams and living inspiring lives.  I am only in my mid-thirties and you and the women you feature have me looking forward, not backward.  That said, I would love to see more of an emphasis on women aging naturally and less emphasis on injections, surgeries, and other procedures that suggest aging is unattractive.  As a woman who has put much time and money into expanding my brain, I have concerns about injecting vials of toxins in that vicinity - and with those who suggest to me that it is the norm.  Women are just as beautiful with facial lines.  Period. Thank you for your time, and I hope my suggestion shapes your future issues.
Sincerely,

Stephanie Stella

I couldn't help but notice the lack of plus size swimsuits in the article that promised Best Swimsuits for every shape, size, budget.  So I can only conclude that plus size women are not desirable readers for your magazine.  I will not purchase another one.

 

I was reading the article by Deborah Copaken Kogan when I came across a sentence that bothered me. That sentence had to do with referring to Sarah Palin's child as "a Down syndrome child". The child always comes first. It should have read " a child with Down Syndrome". I may be a little sensitive as I have a child with Down Syndrome myself.

Allison Carter, Wyckoff, NJ

I just sat down to read this months MORE and as always start at the front and read every page. Well your article prompted this quick email. How about an article about women who can not keep the weight on? I am 61 years young and weigh today 112 but that is because I caught that ugly viral thingy and lost 6 pounds in a week. My height is 5'8" gaining weight is my problem. Please check out my Facebook site to see photos of me. I don't look 61 thanks to all my years of Clinique and only Clinique. I would love an article on how to maintain a nice 120 pounds without a struggle and that struggle would be losing a few pounds. All my vitals are great,I love junk food and I have never had a muffin middle issue. Can you help me? I love your articles and MORE magazine is wonderful.

Dolores Paddock

I rarely make it all the way through other magazine's editor's letters, but I always read yours. I greatly appreciate your self-disclosure. I read the recent article about Lyn-Genet Recitas in the magazine and on your website. I also went to her website but I couldn't find anything about the flax you mentioned that has restored your hair growth. Would you mind telling me what kind of flax you take including the brand (liquid, lignans, seeds) and how much works for you? I know you can't prescribe for me, but I'd just like to know what works for you.

Jillian Brasch

As a 56 year old woman I have enjoyed your magazine for many years. I was particularly intrigued by one sentence in your column in this month’s issue when you were discussing the positive experience you had changing your diet based on the research of Ms. Recitas….”The biotin from the flax has made my hair stop falling out”. I have been struggling with this for several months (probably more but it has become so much more noticeable to me) and am getting tired of hearing “that’s what happens after menopause”, “nothing you can do about it”, “maybe you should look into a wig”..trust me it is not that bad. I am going to my doctor for blood work to rule out anything serious. Anyway…how did you consume the flax that had the biotin?!

Shellie Tapfar

Really? REALLY? I open up a copy of More, a mediocre magazine at best, and am subjected to an article about Kris Jenner? A woman who whores out her entire family (and herself), inflicting them on the American public in ever increasing doses? What was the point of this interview? Is the reader supposed to view Jenner as a successful businesswoman? As a woman who, in reinventing her sorry life, is to be regarded as a model for female entrepreneurs? A woman who pussywhips her husband and pimps out her children as an exemplar of what women can do when they put their minds to things? Incredible. I am appalled and disgusted, and will NOT be renewing my subscription to this trashy, insistently poorly done, unintentionally and ridiculously retro magazine. I couldn’t get the current issue into the trash, where it belongs, fast enough.

MaryEllen Smith

I opened my latest issue looking forward to a small island of sanity to read.  Only to find you were 'celebrating'  Mom Kardashian.  As a parent of a 20 year old daughter, the 'K' girls are the antithesis of what I want my daughter to grow up to be.  They have no real talent - love the SNL spoofs of them and their whiny voices. They gravitate to men with lots of money. They are exhibitionists, complete with sex videos. Mom is 'pimping' out her girls for the dough with the emphasis on how they look not what kind of people they are.  After the great article on Christy Turlington, and how motherhood has changed her life, you basically could have wrote a story about a women who runs a brothel and I would have been more interested in her perspective and views because the madam story would be honest. Mrs. K tries to sell herself as a mom/business woman. Truth is she is just selling her girls as a commodity. She can proud of making her girls media whores. Let's not forget Mrs. K former husband was friends with OJ, a psychopath, who luckily is now in jail.  If he was out, he would be trying to lay all of the girls, and  I can't say that any of them would say no.  He'd have money and influence which is the main family value in the 'K' family. Mom K would be happy with the publicity.  In these hard economic times,  to highlight such a valueless family and such poor examples of feminine accomplishment,  is reprehensible. I won't be renewing my subscription.  I will be forwarding this letter to your advertisers.  I am so sick of seeing this dysfunction family showing up on TV and print.

Christine Valle

As a regular reader of More magazine I appreciate the grown-up, but playful, tone to your articles and reports. Yet I was surprised and disappointed by Selling the Kardashians (July/August). To promote your family members is one thing, but to sell them is quite another. The mindless, over-the-top explosion of the Kardashian women on the cultural scene seemed like more of the usual exhibitionist trash that’s come to dominate the media. But to learn that their mother, Kris Jenner, is behind it all is nothing short of exploitation. Interviewer Amanda Robb all but drools over every diamond-studded utterance from the wanton Jenner who sees no shame in racking up millions by encouraging her daughters to play potty-mouthed tramps in public. That More magazine seems to think this all okay suggests a lack of good judgment and is a disservice to your readers.
Ava Wolf, Mahomet, IL

First Published Thu, 2011-06-30 11:48

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http://www.more.com/member-voices/your-letters/we-hear-you-letters-our-julyaugust-2011-issue