How to Be Happier at Work

Maybe your job is making you blue (only 30 percent of employees are engaged and enthusiastic at work, according to Gallup’s 2013 State of the American Workplace Report). Or maybe you like your job fine but are always interested in optimizing. Here, six scientifically proven ways to be happier on the job

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Chat with Co-Workers

Of all the ways we can boost happiness at work, socializing with colleagues is the most effective, according to a new study from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

 

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Watch TV

The same study found that employees who managed to watch the boob tube during their workday were most relaxed. (Of course, the researchers didn’t take into account what will happen when you ask your boss for cable.)

 

Photo courtesy of artemisphoto/Shutterstock.com

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Work Remotely, If You Can

It may get lonely, but working from home bolsters both productivity and happiness, according to research published by Stanford Business School.

 

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Move to a Smaller Company

You are 25 percent likelier to be happy working for a company with 100 or fewer employees than one with over 1,000, according to a survey from the consultancy firm Delivering Happiness at Work.

 

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Eat Outside

We know that regular exposure to sunlight boosts your mood. So it makes sense that people who eat lunch outdoors experience elevated levels of happiness, according to research from the University of Sussex. The most effective environment to boost your mood? The beach, followed by a public green space and a restaurant.

 

 Photo courtesy of Martin Novak/Shutterstock.com

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Work Less

A study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows that those who regularly work overtime have higher levels of both anxiety and depression.

 

 Photo courtesy of Logan Bannatyne/Shutterstock.com

 

Next: Why the Mommy Wars Rage On

 

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