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3 Amazing Teen Girls Invented A Straw That Detects Date Rape Drugs In Drinks

Three Miami teenagers invented the "Smart Straw" to detect date rape drugs in drinks, and to help women take control of their safety.

Every 98 seconds, someone is sexually assaulted in the United States, according to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN). One in six women will be a victim of sexual assault (some studies suggest even more), and as reported by the Department of Justice, 4.2 percent of victims receive date rape drugs. In the face of these heartbreaking statistics, though, three high school students from Miami are doing what they can and have invented drug-detecting straws to help combat the problem.

After Susana Cappello heard about students being drugged at her sister's college, she and friends Victoria Roca and Carolina Baigorri came up with the idea for the straws during one of their entrepreneurship classes at Gulliver Preparatory School in Miami.

Originally, Gulliver's business-plan competition rejected the idea, but the trio didn't let that stop them. Instead, they entered a bigger contest—the Miami Herald Business Plan Competition—and won.

The "Smart Straw's" design has two test strips that turn navy blue when any of the three most common date rape drugs—Rohypnol, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), or ketamine—are detected.

Not only do they hope to prevent sexual assault with this invention, but they also hope to prevent some sex traffickers, who also have been known to use date rape drugs.

The trio is currently working on getting a patent and hoping to crowdfund soon, so that colleges, clubs, bars, and restaurants can make the straws readily available to customers.

The straws obviously aren't the solution to preventing rape, and TBH it shouldn't be on women to detect drugs in the first place. And while these Smart Straws also aren't addressing the root of the drugging problem, technologies like this and the nail polish created by North Carolina students can offer women more control over their own safety while progress and awareness is continuing to be made.

"We know it's not a solution because it can't end rape," Baigorri told Inside Edition. "But we were hoping to lower the amount of rape and dangerous situations you might be in through drugs."

Check out the Smart Straws Instagram account for updates!

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Hannah Marsh

Hannah is a Texas-born, Iowa-raised alumna of Iowa State University. When not writing trending content across several Meredith sites, she enjoys all things fitness-related, binge-watching "Whose Line is it Anyway" episodes and fully embracing her self-diagnosed peanut butter addiction.

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